**Eddie Bravo**Teaching at 10th Planet Jiu Jitsu Van Nuys June 10th!

June 4th, 2013 In 10th Planet Van Nuys, News, Seminars | Comments Off

Eddie Bravo at 10th Planet Van Nuys

 

Eddie Bravo will be gracing the mats of 10th Planet Van Nuys next Monday, June 10th. He is one of the most prolific figures in all of MMA and Jiu Jitsu. He’s not afraid to speak his mind when it comes just about anything. 10th Planet is constantly evolving, and Grandmaster Bravo will be teaching the latest advancements in the system. He is always researching, developing, refining and updating techniques. You don’t want to miss out on any of the new stuff! 

Due to limited amounts of space, this event is only for current 10th Planet Van Nuys team members. However, if you’d like to join our team in time for this event, there’s still time to sign up, and get in on the action. 

We’re having super summer specials right now, so call us!!! (818) 781-JITS (5487). You’ve probably been thinking about signing up for a while now anyways, and these prices won’t last forever. Call and book a free class to see what we’re all about. Best way to see if 10th Planet is for you is to take a test drive. There’s no strings attached, what have you got to lose? I can guarantee you’ll love our program, and our prices, for what you’re getting are out of site. 

Did I mention, we have morning, night, and weekend classes? We  have classes for beginners, seasoned vets, and competitors too. Think you’re too old or too young? Think Jiu Jitsu isn’t for girls? Nonsense, we have classes for everybody!!!

After you come try us out, and you still find you’re not convinced, you can walk away no hard feelings, and no pressure sales. We only want people to join our team who absolutely want to be there. That’s why we have such an amazing vibe at our school. Our instructors and our members all are incredibly passionate about Jiu Jitsu, and it shows!  Stop making up excuses and jump in today! You’re future black belt awaits you.  

Best,

Coach Alder

P.S. interested in checking out our website? Go to www.10thPlanetVanNuys.com (sign up for our newsletter!)

 


10th Planet’s First Black Belt, Denny Prokopos is Teaching a Seminar June 1st in Van Nuys!

May 15th, 2013 In 10th Planet Van Nuys, Seminars | Comments Off

Denny Prokopos Seminar

June 1st, 2013 @12pm

10th Planet Jiu Jitsu Van Nuys

16760 Stagg St. Suite 218

Van Nuys, CA 91406

www.10thPlanetVanNuys.com

(818) 781-5487

 

 

Denny’s Bio

Denny Prokopos was born in San Francisco around 1988. He was interested in Pro Wrestling as a child, and it was looking for Pro Wrestling tapes at a video store that he found out about the UFC. He bought a few tapes of the fighting organization’s first tournaments at the store and as he saw the footage he was amazed by Royce Gracie’s prowess inside the cage. He was so fascinated by the Gracie Jiu Jitsu style that he managed to convince his parents to let him train Jiu Jitsu (who vehemently opposed to it in the beginning). He was 12 years old when he started and his first coach was Charles Gracie.

As Denny got more involved with Jiu Jitsu, he started preferring the Nogi aspect of the game; this was when he sought out Eddie Bravo for private classes in Nogi. Eddie at the time had already made a name for himself in the Nogi community and was a great believer of the benefits of training without the kimono. Denny ended up leaving his previous instructor and turning his full attention to Eddie Bravo’s way of thought and method, he was around 16 at the time.

In highschool Denny Prokopos also added wrestling to his resume, competing all throughout secondary School with the exception of the last year due to a bad injury that prevented him from training. He ended up quitting the academic life to focus solely on Jiu Jitsu training and competition, that hard work and dedication paid off with several important victories at a national and international stage, culminating with his black belt award in 2009. In that same year he was part of the American National Team at the FILA Grappling Championship, being coached by Ricardo Liborio in preparation for the tournament (a competition he won), he has also worked extensively with Jake Shields.

 

-BJJ Heros


10th Planet Van Nuys Jan ’13 Curriculum: Arm Drag to Rear Naked Choke (RNC)

January 8th, 2013 In Techniques, Uncategorized | Comments Off

The arm drag is a versitile move, both on the ground and from standing. It can be used to set up finishes, or set up takedowns. Ever since learning it after Marcello Garcia crushed everybody with it, it has been a staple of my game. Below is one of my favorite ways to get the RNC.

I don’t talke too much about it in this article, but hand fighting is a huge part of getting the armdrag. Without winner the hand fight, it’ll be very difficult to be able to just grab the arm straight forward. Now days, the set up to the armdrag is just as important as the armdrag itself.

If you’re in the area, and you’re looking to train with us, give us a call today (818) 925-JITS (5487)


18 Tips To Help You In BJJ & Grappling Competition

December 13th, 2010 In Theory | 1 Comment

18 Tips To Help You In BJJ & Grappling Competition
(and Why Competitions Are a Good Idea)

I try to compete in grappling tournaments as much as I possibly can. Why is that you might ask? Well it’s for many different reasons:

The love of competition – The first reason is that I love to test myself and compete. I love the challenge that competitions present and after a good match win or lose I am glad I stepped on the mat against someone I didn’t even know. Competitions are fun for me and that is what really motivates me.

It’s a true test – Competition is a true test of how all of your grappling skills come together. Under the stress of competition the true nature of your skills come out. There isn’t any lying to yourself or anyone else about your abilities. It is just you, your opponent, and your mind and it’s up to you during that time and in the environment to decide what you’re going to do with it.

  • How are you going to handle the crowd?
  • How are you going to handle the butterflies in your stomach?
  • How are you going to face the person across from you that you don’t even know anything about?
  • Are you going to remember your techniques?
  • Are you going to freeze up, or are you going to stay calm and do everything you do in the gym and win?

Those are just a few of the tests that you have to face in competition and it is great to see how you would do. Competition helps to let you know where you stand in the larger scheme of things by giving you a realistic look at where you stand against other guys with the same experience level as yourself.

The people I meet – As with your classes and training, competitions are a great place to meet people who love doing what you do. I have been fortunate to meet many great people from going to competitions. I have made friends, been invited to other training facilities, and got to know many great people from going to competitions.

Not many people think of competitions in this manner, but you never know as far as the people you meet and how they might affect your life. I try to not live mine as a hermit and I take advantage of the different people I can meet, because they just might help me become a better person and help me lead a life that I might not have been able to lead if I didn’t meet them.

The experience and learning – While competition is a test of your skill against an opponent you aren’t used to and in an environment you aren’t used to there is no such thing as passing or failing in competition. The one thing that does always happen after competition is growth

I have never participated in a competition and not learned something or gained a greater experience of grappling, whether I was to win or lose. Every time I step off of the competition mat I step off a better grappler, a better person, and someone who wants to work harder.

Now you may not feel exactly the way I feel, but I guarantee you will feel something. You may be angry because you lost, you may feel satisfied because you did better than you thought, or you may be pumped up because you won. Either way you are walking off with a feeling, and with those feelings you will analyze. You’ll analyze what you did right, and what you did wrong. You’ll analyze what you could have done, and what you should have done. You’ll analyze the way you felt, your conditioning, how the crowd made you feel, and so on.

With all of that analyzing you will grow. Sometimes it just isn’t the same as practice. With practice you do learn but you don’t really analyze that much because it is something that you do on a regular basis. You warm-up, you do some drills, learn some techniques, and you roll. You may think about it after, but with not much analyzing. After a competition though you won’t be able to help but to analyze what you did. This will make you so much better then you can imagine.

You will be pumped up for the next training session and to drill the things that you feel you need to work on as a result of your match and you will grow. You will have gained an experience that you just can’t mimic in practice.

You may want to compete even more, or you may not want to compete any more, but you will not be able to walk away from that competition without learning something.

Here are some things that I’ve learned from competition whether I won or I lost:

  • I have learned that it’s ok to be nervous and I’m not the only one.
  • I have learned how to test myself in uncomfortable situations.
  • I have gained confidence.
  • I have learned many things that I need to work on and trust me I have worked on those areas.
  • I learned what it’s like to step out of my comfort zone and to know its ok.
  • I learned that I am better than others.
  • I learned that others are better than me.
  • I learned that it’s ok to lose.
  • I learned that if feels great to win.
  • I learned that I will learn more every time I compete.

That’s not even a complete list, but I’m sure you get the point. If you are worried about competing and if you’re not sure if it’s for you, you’ll never know unless you try. The people who become champions and who succeed in life didn’t do so because they thought about trying it’s because they did try.

Here are some tips to help you make your first competition go smoother:

  1. Try to think of it as an extension of your training. Think about it as if you’re going to class to train during an open mat but you get to roll even harder. This helps me to relax and realize that it isn’t the end of the world. It really is only a grappling competition. In the whole scheme of life the only person who really is worried about if you win or lose is you and not anyone else.
  2. Try your hardest to win, but if you don’t, keep your head up and make sure you learn something from it because if you don’t and you just let your ego get in the way then you pretty much just wasted $70 to $90. Know that when you leave that building, that one day really didn’t affect your future in anyway and that you will always be able to get better and test yourself again.
  3. What I like to do to help me from getting tunnel vision and zoning out while I’m grappling is when I first step on the mat. I look around in the bleachers and turn my body 360 degrees and I take in the spectators and the environment. This helps my mind adjust to the open environment and helps me focus on my opponent during the match. This also helps me relax.
  4. Practice breathing. Practicing my breathing helps me to relax and focus. It helps me keep a clear mind and it also helps me control the adrenaline that is kicking in. By doing this it keeps me from getting gassed out quickly even though I probably had the conditioning. You’d be surprised on what your adrenaline can do to you and if you don’t control it. You’ll gas out fast and feel like you’re hyperventilating. So take the time before your matches to close your eyes, visualize, and breathe. Many times right when I step onto the mat I take in two or three deep breathes in though my nose and out of my mouth. This helps slow my heart rate.
  5. Remember to breathe when you’re out there, don’t breathe in with your mouth. Please, I repeat PLEASE do not hold your breath when you’re out there. First of all if you have high blood pressure it’s not good for you and second of all you’ll gas out in a second.
  6. Also breathe in through your nose. Don’t breathe in through your mouth. Breathing in through your mouth takes more energy and also gives the feeling of hyperventilation which in turn leads to you losing your wind and not even being able to move your own arms. Trust me, I know. Breathing is a big part of the game that many people lack. If you get this down it’s going to bring you one step closer to not ever having to worry about gassing out when you roll.
  7. It’s usually a good idea to watch your opponents who compete before you. The reason is because it gives you a good perspective on what type of game they might play. This will help get you ready for them if you were to meet up in later matches. You may see someone who pulls guard right away, and this may help you go for the takedown quicker because you know they’re going to pull guard anyone. Or you may see someone with a really good guard and you might be able to pull guard on them to stop them from playing their game.
  8. Either way by watching your opponent’s it usually helps you get a little understanding about what it is that they do.
  9. Try to have your instructor or someone from your team be there on the sidelines with you to help coach you. This is a great resource because your coach can usually see many things and opportunities that you can’t see yourself. This will give you the ability to open up your game a bit more.
  10. One important thing however is that you don’t forget that your coach is out there trying to help you when you’re actually competing. Many people get out on the mat and they lose perspective of everything around them. This makes it much harder for someone to coach you because when you are in this situation you probably don’t even know your coach is there anymore. So do your best to stay focused. Anytime you have the chance to listen to your coach or if you have great control and you can even look at him (just pay attention to what you’re doing also) then do so. It will help.
  11. Do not drink orange juice or any acidic drink the day of your match. You don’t want to be the only person in the gym throwing up on the mat do you?
  12. Bring water but don’t over drink the water. You’ll be surprised on how dry your mouth will get just because of your nerves. Take in little sips here and there to keep your mouth moist. Also make sure you don’t drink too much water to where you’re full because you’ll definitely feel it.
  13. Do some sort of yoga or meditation exercises the night before. By doing this it helps you relax the night before and clear your mind. Keeping you from getting nervous the night before and losing sleep. Doing some relaxation yoga or meditation exercise before you go to sleep will help you get a better nights sleep.
  14. Make sure you bring your mouthpiece. I know a lot of people don’t where mouth guards when they compete even though the competitions say that you have to where one, but the one day you get smashed in your mouth and lose a tooth then you’ll definitely wish you wore a mouth piece. Trust me I know from experience when I chipped one of my teeth from not wearing a mouth piece.
  15. Bring flip flops or sandals. Please do not be one of those people who walk in those disgusting bathrooms without any shoes or socks on and then steps on the mats. I really don’t understand it and it’s not the most sanitary thing in the world. Do help the grappling community be clean and bring a pair of flip-flops or sandals to where when you walk around the gym. They are easy to take on and off before you compete and it helps prevent the spread of disease.
  16. Expect a long day. Unfortunately 95% of all grappling tournaments last forever so if you know what to expect right in the beginning it will help you get mentally prepared. So if you read this you now know that there is a big chance you will be waiting around for a while to compete. Make sure you stay focused and tell yourself that you knew it was going to be like this.
  17. It’s a good idea to bring something to pass the time. You can bring a book to read, a portable DVD player, some cards, an iPod, a portable video game console or something, but whatever you bring it will help the day go by much better without having anything at all.
  18. Out of all of these the biggest tip I can give you is to have FUN. If you’re not having fun then whatever you went through for the competition really isn’t worth it. You need to have fun even when you’re trying your hardest to win. You should be in there not only to win, but to have a good time and a great learning experience. Activities without fun turn into work. Do you really want to work anymore then you already do? I know I don’t.

Good Luck!

Jason Scully
Grappler’s Guide Academy
Grappler’s Guide Community

I took this blog entry from http://www.grapplearts.com/


Chuck Liddel Representin’!

March 23rd, 2010 In MMA | 1 Comment

Don’t forget to watch Chuck Liddel’s Jiu Jitsu coach, 10th Planet Burbank’s own, Scott “Einstein” Epstein on this season of The Ultimate Fighter.

Chuck wearing a 10thp#3B0A5


10TH Planet Morgantown – Butch Hiles Tourny

March 21st, 2010 In Tournaments | Comments Off

10TH Planet Morgantown Invades
Butch Hiles BJJ Tourny
Charleston, WV February 20, 2010
Head Coach – Neale Hoerle
Judson Swart, Ryon Anderson, Walt Ramsey and Don Quinn


Eddie Bravo: “MMA Is a Triathlon.”

March 20th, 2010 In Interviews | 3 Comments

You can see me in the back on the right at 1:55. One of my crowning achievements as a human being.


FIGHT! Life – Eddie Bravo: From “Man Show” to Dojo

March 19th, 2010 In Interviews | Comments Off


There Can Only Be One: Denny”300″ Prokopos

March 18th, 2010 In Interviews | 1 Comment

Denny “300″ Prokopos will be a part of Jiu Jitsu history for a long time. He is the first person awarded a Black belt by Eddie Bravo. When Eddie first started teaching the Rubber Guard people were writing it off. They said it was not very effective or practical. Nevertheless Eddie Bravo won over a lot of students across the planet. Many are highly skilled. Many medal in various tournaments. Yet one proud Greek student, Denny “300″ Prokopos soaked up the game at an insane pace. He moved ahead with a work ethic thats hard to match. At the end of the day, Eddie Bravo could only award ONE man the first Black Belt in his system. This is his story.

…for the rest of the article, click HERE.


10th Planet HQ: Dustin Advance 145lbs match

March 17th, 2010 In Tournaments | 6 Comments

Dustin Advance 145 match from Krezer on Vimeo.


The Art of Shrimping in BJJ by Keith Owen

March 16th, 2010 In Techniques | 2 Comments

Keith Owen, Pedro Sauer black belt, shows the art of shrimping, Shrimping is very important in grappling as it allows you to regain half or full guard when on your back. For more information about Keith Owen, visit his site: http://www.bjjmoves.com


Conor Heun @ Grapplers X tournament Feb 14, 2010

March 15th, 2010 In Tournaments | 4 Comments

I’d love to see Conor do more grappling tournaments. He’s an amazing competitor.

“Here is my first match back in competition since my knee surgery. It was at the Grapplers X tournament in Long Beach on Feb 14, 2010. I set up my takedowns off of the Russian 2-on-1 or the baseball grip 2-on-1. The first take down is a Japanese Double when he stands up too straight, anticipating the tie up. The second is a submarine throw of of the Russian with the “Hurricane Grip”. If you are interested in learning these techniques I am available for Private Lessons. Please e-mail me or comment for info.”


Compella and the Twister: Dropped

March 14th, 2010 In Uncategorized | Comments Off


FIGHT! Life: The Twister vs. The Legend, with Eddie Bravo

March 13th, 2010 In Interviews | 2 Comments

In Free Trip to Brazil,” MMA legend Eddie Bravo told us about his unlikely victory at the North American trials for the ADCC Submission Grappling World Championships, the best competition of its kind on the planet. In part three of this FIGHT! Life series, Bravo, who arrived in Sao Paolo, Brazil as a brown belt surrounded by black-belt masters, recounts his now-legendary fight with Royler Gracie, the undisputed top dog in the sport who had never given up a single point in his career. Bravo had nothing to lose. Heres what happened.

Produced and directed by Matthew Ross. Shot by Rick Lee, Marc Rizzo, and Randy Ward. Edited by Ashley Cahill and Ryan Jackson-Healy.


Kettle Weight Shrimp Drill

March 12th, 2010 In Techniques, Theory | 2 Comments

For all you crazy kettle bell folks. I know who wont be doing this, Scott Epstein.    ;)

“Neale Hoerle – 10th Planet Morgantown Head Coach

25lb. Kettle Weight Twisting Drill
30-50 rep range

Rotation Twist Strength”

rength